Q&A Monday

For all your beauty advice…

Good morning, and Happy Monday! I hope everyone had a great weekend. I got some great questions this week, thanks for sending them in! Read on about when to apply false eyelashes, red bumps on arms, and cleaning up nail polish around the fingers.

Dear Brooke, I want to start wearing false lashes but I’m confused as to when I put them on. Before I do my eye makeup, or after I do my eye makeup? Does it even make a difference? Tracy A.

Dear Tracy, In my opinion, it’s what works best for you. I have always told people that they should put their eyeshadow on first, then apply the lashes, then apply mascara to bind the false eyelashes with your real lashes for a natural look. If you put the lashes on first, I feel like they get in the way of putting on eyeshadow.

Dear Brooke, I have these pimply, raised, blotchy patches on the back of my arms (above the elbow). They are like lots of little white heads and the skin is very red. I have tried lots of things to try to get rid of them (scrubs, spot creams, moisturizer, peels, antiseptic gel!) but nothing works. They look really awful and I have a summer ball to go to in a couple of weeks. I  really don’t want to wear sleeves but at the moment I won’t have a choice because I feel so self-conscious about it.  Please, please help!! Thank you, Lisa T.
 
Dear Lisa, I have heard, and seen, the skin condition you are writing about. It’s called Keratosis Pilaris (KP). It’s not uncommon, and it can be treated. Basically, what’s happening is your skin cells aren’t turning over, or shedding, at the normal rate and proteins are getting trapped in hair follicles and forming those bumps you’re talking about. You need to gently exfoliate the area using a loofah and a mild body wash…start exfoliating every other day, and then work up to doing this daily. After you exfoliate the area, you’ll need to apply a treatment lotion that contains either salicylic acid, or glycolic acid. I have heard really good opinions on a product from Dermadoctor called KP Duty. I’ve also heard success stories with using acne treatment on the affected area. If you go that route, make sure it’s salicylic acid in the treatment. Salicylic acid will help because it’s promoting cell turnover and topically sloughing off the skin. Good luck, and let me know if that helps!
 
Dear Brooke, I am 12, I love playing around with nail polish but I have a hard time not making a mess on my fingers with the polish when I’m done. What’s the easiest way to clean up around my nails after I’m done? Kayla L.
 
Dear Kayla, You can try a few things to clean up nail polish around your nails. Probably the easiest, because you probably have it on hand, is to take a q-tip and dip it in your polish remover and start cleaning up. If you have a small paint brush that’s clean you can try it with that instead. I think using a brush gives you more control, and a better clean up. But, if all you have is a q-tip, try that. It will work, but it might leave pieces of cotton behind. Have fun trying new things with polish, and take your time. Thanks for the question!
 
Thanks for the great questions this week, keep them coming! Email me your questions for Q&A Monday to brookeknowsbeauty@hotmail.com
 
You’ve Been Beautified!

Quick Tip Friday

For all your beauty advice…

Let cold water be your secret beauty weapon! When you’re rinsing your hair in the shower, rinse with cold water. This will seal the top layer of your hair (the cuticle) and give you a healthy shine. And, if you can brave it, fill a large bowl with very cold water, and submerge your face in the cold water. This will tighten up pores, give you a healthy glow for the day, and if nothing else, wake you up immediately!

You’ve Been Beautified!

Q&A Monday

For all your beauty advice…

Good morning, and Happy Monday! I hope everyone had a great weekend, and a great Father’s Day. Thanks for the questions this week. Read on about mature skin cleansing, makeup brushes, and adding bangs to your style.

Dear Brooke, as I’m getting older, I’m noticing the need for anti-aging products. My problem is, even though my skin is needing the mature ingredients, it’s also still on the oily side and prone to acne. Most cleansers I get for my “older” skin are cream cleansers that don’t break down the daily oil on my face. If I use an acne cleanser, it’s too drying. I need something that somewhere in the middle, can you help? Linda E.

Dear Linda, I think you just described my skin to me! What you’ve described is a frustrating situation, indeed. And, it’s one I was dealing with not so long ago. What I think works the best is two different cleansers. I use a gel cleanser, that foams, in the evening so I can get the oil and the makeup completely off my face for the day. In the morning, I use an anti-aging cream cleanser. Unless you get really oily overnight, I would suggest trying this. I know some people don’t like the idea of having so many different products lying around (I would not be that person!) but oily/acne-prone/mature skin has different needs at different times of the day, so give this a try, and let me know what you think.

Dear Brooke, I am slowly starting to use makeup brushes, but they’re so expensive! I have noticed some really cheap ones and wanted to know if there’s really that much of a difference between a blush brush that costs $5 as opposed to $25? Ashley O.

Dear Ashley, With most things in life, you get what you pay for…the same goes with makeup brushes. What you’re going to find if you go with the cheap ones is, stiff brush hairs that don’t hold the product very well, brush hairs left behind on your face after use, and basically it falling apart in a very short amount of time. I know there can be sticker shock when you are initially making the purchase of a makeup brush, but if you’re serious about starting to use them, then slowly start adding them to your collection. You don’t have to pay a ton of money for them. Sephora has affordable makeup brushes, and Mary Kay has them as well. I always suggest people get started with a brush kit and then add brushes over time. Take good care of a good brush, and it will last forever!

Dear Brooke, I am wanting a different look with my hair and thinking of bangs, but I’m afraid they will look too “little girl”. I know if I hate them, I am stuck with them for a while. Any suggestions to get over it, and just take the gamble? I’m kind of freaking out! Debbie R.

Dear Debbie, No need to freak out, calm down! Yes, getting bangs is a commitment, but not one for life. Start with a long bang so you can sweep them to the side if you aren’t liking how they look. Talk with your stylist about different ways to wear them, and don’t get nervous about it, get excited for a new look! Your stylist will be able to suggest some variations, and they will also know how to cut them to avoid them looking too “little girl”. I think it’s a fun change to add bangs to your style, and it also allows you to wear a pony tail and still look put together if your hair is long enough to pull back. So, go for it, don’t freak out, and enjoy your new look!

Thanks again for the questions this week, keep them coming! Email me your questions for Q&A Monday to brookeknowsbeauty@hotmail.com

You’ve Been Beautified!

Quick Tip Friday

For all your beauty advice…

If you bought a liquid illuminating product and you’re not sure what to do with it, mix a drop of it in your foundation for an all over glow. This will brighten your complexion and make your skin look radiant. If you use mineral foundation, mix a drop of the illuminating liquid with your moisturizer for the same effect.

You’ve Been Beautified!

Q&A Monday

For all your beauty advice…

Good morning, and Happy Monday! I hope everyone had a great weekend, and you’ve been able to stay cool in the heat! As always, thank you for the great questions this week. Read on about protecting thin skin, the importance of trimming your hair, and protecting hair from sun and chlorine damage.

Dear Brooke, I’ve been spending a lot of time in the sun lately, and I’ve noticed the skin on my neck and chest seems to burn so fast, and then it looks wrinkled when it’s healing from the burn. I put sunscreen on all over, but this certain area seems to not get the protection the rest of my skin is getting. Help! Wendy K.

Dear Wendy, The skin on the neck and chest is so much thinner than the skin on your face and the rest of your body. As we age, that skin gets more delicate, losing moisture and elasticity. It’s so important to make sure that area is getting the proper skin care. When I worked as an esthetician, I always told my clients that your face doesn’t just stop at your chin, you need to put your skin care on your neck and your chest, as well. If you are going out in the sun for a long period of time, make sure you have that area protected, and make sure you are reapplying frequently to your chest and neck. After you’ve been in the sun, moisturize, moisturize, moisturize!! Even if you didn’t get red, you need to feed that moisture back into your skin to keep that area looking young!

Dear Brooke, I have been trying to grow my hair out for so long, and it just seems like it’s stuck at this length. I haven’t cut it in a year, hoping that would help it grow, and it’s not budging! I want it really long, but it’s in the middle of my back and I feel like that’s as long as it’s going to get. Any tips on getting my hair to grow? Amanda M.

Dear Amanda, If I knew how to grow hair, I’d be a millionaire! There really isn’t anything you can do to force your hair to grow. I’ve always been taught that hair has a life-span…meaning it’s going to get to a certain length and that’s as long as it will grow. We can’t all be Rapunzel. You need to get regular trims for the overall health of your hair. Trimming your hair will not make it grow, but it will remove split ends. Typically, you should be getting your hair cut every other month, at the latest. But, if you’re taking good care of your hair, and trying to grow it out, you can push that trim to every 3 months. Try not to focus so much on the length of your hair; focus on the health of your hair. If your hair is to the middle of your back, that’s pretty long. Take care of it, and don’t stress about the length!

Dear Brooke, I just got my daughter into swim lessons, and already I’m noticing her hair is dry on the ends, and has a light green cast to it (she’s blonde). Her lessons are through the summer and I don’t want her hair to be completely damaged. What can we do to keep her hair healthy while swimming 2 days a week? Kara R.

Dear Kara, You can do a couple of things to protect your daughter’s hair through the summer. You didn’t say if the lessons were indoors, or out, so I don’t know if the sun is contributing to the dryness in her hair. The best thing to do before she gets in the pool is, have her wet down her hair and comb a leave-in conditioner through her hair. If her hair is long enough, braid it, and wrap it into a bun. The conditioner acts as a barrier on her hair and will prevent the chlorine from causing damage. Her best bet is to wear a swim cap…if she will wear one, still have her do the conditioner on her hair. After she’s been in the pool, she’ll need to use a clarifying shampoo to deep clean her hair and get all the chemicals from the pool off her hair. Once a week, have her do a hair mask/deep conditioner on a day when she’s not swimming. I know this seems like a lot of hair care, but you’ll be happy you did it once the summer is over!

Thanks again for the great questions, keep them coming! Email me your questions for Q&A Monday to brookeknowsbeauty@hotmail.com

You’ve Been Beautified!

Quick Tip Friday

For all your beauty advice…

If your hair is feeling dull, or lifeless, try an at home glaze. You can get one at any beauty supply. It’s a clear gloss you put on your hair, and it can last up to 6 weeks. It will make your hair look shiny, and healthy. It will make your color look refreshed, and because the glaze is coating the strands of your hair, it will make it feel thicker and give it tons of body!

You’ve Been Beautified!

Q&A Monday

For all your beauty advice…

Good morning and Happy Monday! I hope you all had a great weekend, and stayed cool in the heat. Thanks for the great questions this week! Read on about hair color that turned brassy, what I recommend in a flat-iron, and removing stubborn lip stain.

Dear Brooke, I did my own hair color about a month ago. It was a very pretty golden blonde that I got a lot of compliments on, but a few weeks after I colored it, my hair started to look brassy and almost orange, especially on the ends of my hair. I prefer to do my own color because of cost, so how can I make sure this doesn’t happen? Angie L.

Dear Angie, I have a hunch most people, including yourself, might be braced for a lecture from me on doing your own color. I’m not going to do that. You can still do it yourself at home, but a few changes need to be made. When you choose your next color, stay away from anything with a gold undertone. If you get your hair color at a supply place like Sally Beauty Supply, typically the colors are a number with a letter. 7G for example; the G means gold. If you’re getting your color at a drug store, don’t get anything that uses the word Gold in the description. Gold undertones tend to get brassy, and it can make your hair look orange, and your complexion look sallow. So, stay with a neutral color, and try a color correcting shampoo if you still have that problem. The blue or purple base of a color correcting shampoo with counteract the brassiness, but you will have to use it on a daily basis. Good luck with your next home hair color!

Dear Brooke, what are your favorite styling tools as far as flat irons? What should I be looking for to get the best quality? Madison D.

Dear Madison, With so many flat irons/styling tools on the market right now, I can see how it can be very overwhelming. The two things I look for in a flat-iron are floating panels, and even heat distribution. Floating panels are the plates that heat up to “iron” your hair into your style. If you put your finger on the panel (while it’s off, of course) and press down, the panel will move up and down and side to side. This is an important feature because it moves with you as you pull the tool through your hair and your hair won’t get stuck in the sides of the panels and get ripped out. Even heat distribution is important because if you are using a flat-iron that heats up mostly in the center and just a little toward the ends of the panels, not only will your hair not look completely polished when you’re done, but your hair will also get some damage in certain spots. Even heat distribution will make sure all the hair is getting the same amount of heat for the best style, and health for your hair. My favorites? Croc, T3, and Sultra.

Dear Brooke, I have discovered lip stains, and I am in love! The only problem is, if I wear the same color a few days in a row, it won’t budge when I go to remove it. I like to wear different colors on different days, but my lips seem permanently stained and other colors won’t show on me. How can I remove the stain all the way? Heather P.

Dear Heather, I don’t know what method you’re using now to get the lip stain off, but I’ll share with you a few methods I’ve used in the past. If you have some Vaseline on hand, put some on your lips, and let it sit for a few minutes and then wipe it off. That should get most of the stain off your lips, if not all of it. If the stain is really stubborn, mix sugar with olive oil and gently buff that on your lips to exfoliate the top surface and break down the color of the stain. When all else fails, I’ve been known to take eye makeup remover to my lips to get rid of a stubborn stain…just make sure you don’t get it in your mouth! Hope that helps.

Thanks again for the great questions this week, keep them coming! Email me your questions for Q&A Monday to brookeknowsbeauty@hotmail.com

You’ve Been Beautified!